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V60

At our slow bar we offer a variety of different brewing methods.  The one that we prefer and use the most often is Hario's V60 method of brewing.  The reason we prefer it is because it's simple to use, it extracts great flavor from the beans, and it's generally faster than other manual brewing methods.  When using a V60 the final product will have a complex yet clean composition that can be enjoyed by all.  That means there isn't a bunch of grit and grounds, and yet the flavor is beyond your typical coffee expectations.  

By the Bean V60 tutorial

What you need:  V60, V60 filter, Gooseneck Kettle, Scale, and a great bag of whole bean coffee from By the Bean.  We carry Hario equipment in store so be sure to grab what you need.  

1.  Heat Water to 195-205 degrees.  This is just a little bit under boiling

2. Weigh and grind your beans.  A good rule is to grind double in grams what you want in ounces.  So if making a 12 ounce cup of coffee then you will need 24 grams of coffee beans.  Grind it coarse like sea salt and set aside.  

3.  Put the filter in the V60 cone as evenly as possible.  Pour hot water over filter to completely wet filter before brewing.  This will remove some of the papery taste from your actual cup of coffee.  

4. Pour your grounds into the filter.  Try to make them as flat as possible, then add a small indention in the middle with your thumb or spoon or whatever you prefer.  

5.  Set a timer for 3 minutes and 15 seconds.  If doing more than 12 ounces then add 30 seconds per 6 ounces.  

6.  Start timer and begin your first pour.  You want to pour 50 grams or until the grounds are evenly saturated.  The pour should always be a slow stream running straight up and down and not at any angles.  After the first pour has begin let the coffee "bloom" for one minute.  This is the natural degassing process of the beans and where a lot of the flavor is going to come from.

7.  After a minute has passed on your timer begin your next pour.  Each pour should be 70-100 grams, or 2.5-3 ounces.  Keep the stream straight up and down, start in the middle and work your way out to the edge moving the stream clockwise.  Try to not pour water on the edge of the coffee but keep a little space of coffee grounds between the pour and the filter all the way around.  

8.  If using your scale, you will want to stop pouring at 400 grams.  This should give you a 12 ounce cup and the pourover should be complete as close to 3 minutes and 15 seconds as possible.   

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AEROPRESS

AeroPress has become a very popular brewing method because of it's convenience, durability, and uniqueness; and because they are just fun to use.  What makes an AeroPress special is that it uses full immersion brewing, similar to a french press, but when the product is complete it's still very clean.  In addition to the unique flavor profile, it's also one of the most portable manual brewing device's on the market.  

In our tutorial we are going to tell you how we brew using a standard AeroPress but it doesn't mean this is the only way to use them.  The fun in using these devices is that you can experiment with so many brewing methods and finding the one that works for you is always recommended.  If you like a different method, come in and tell us about it.  

What you need:  Aerobie AeroPress, AeroPress Filters, Scale,Hot Water, and a bag of your favorite whole bean coffees from By the Bean.  

1.  Set up your AeroPress inverted, or upside down.  So that the tank is propped up with the plunger.  The plunger should be in the very bottom so it's as tall as possible.  

2.  Finely grind 18 grams of coffee.  

3. Pour the coffee in the tank.

4.  Start a timer for 2 minutes and slowly begin to pour hot water (195-205 degrees) in the tank.  We slowly pour while rotating the AeroPress so that the grounds are evenly covered and submersed.  Pour until you reach 220 grams.

5.  Stir it with the Aeropress padel, 4-6 full stirs.  .  

6.  Take your AeroPress filter and put it on the filter strainer.  Pour a little hot water over this so that the filter seals to the strainer.  

6. Screw the strainer on top.

7.  When the two minutes are up, put your cup upside down on top of the AeroPress and in one movement, carefully flip the whole press over so that it is balanced on top of your cup.  Begin to slowly plunge.

8.  When you hear a hissing sound immediately stop plunging.  Your coffee is done.  

It  makes 6-8 ounces at a time.  Some people drink it straight while others will dilute to make a full cup.  That is up to you.  It's also fun to plunge it over ice as it makes a great iced coffee.  

 

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CHEMEX

Chemex is great because you can make more than 1-2 cups of coffee.  Chemex pourover units are all one piece, and have become many fine folks preferred method of manual brewing.  They are well know for providing a very clean flavor because they use thicker filters, but it is also a little slower for this same reason.

What you need:  Chemex, Chemex Filter, Gooseneck Kettle, Scale, and a great bag of whole bean coffee from By the Bean.   

1.  Heat Water to 195-205 degrees.  This is just a little bit under boiling

2. Weigh and grind your beans.  A good rule is to grind double in grams what you want in ounces.  So if making a 24 ounce chemex then you will need 48 grams of coffee beans.  Grind it coarse like sea salt and set aside.  

3.  Put the filter in the Chemex cone as evenly as possible.  Pour hot water over filter to completely wet filter before brewing.  This will remove some of the papery taste from your actual cup of coffee.  Be sure the filter seem is over the Chemex spout and that there is a true air gap there.

4. Pour your grounds into the filter.  Try to make them as flat as possible, then add a small indention in the middle with your thumb or spoon or whatever you prefer.  

5.  Set a timer for 4 minutes and 45 seconds.  If doing more than 24 ounces then add 30 seconds per 6 ounces.  

6.  Start timer and begin your first pour.  You want to pour to 100 grams or until the grounds are evenly saturated.  The pour should always be a slow stream running straight up and down and not at any angles.  After the first pour has begun let the coffee "bloom" for one minute.  This is the natural degassing process of the beans and where a lot of the flavor is going to come from.

7.  After a minute has passed on your timer begin your next pour.  Each pour should be 70-100 grams, or 2.5-3 ounces.  Keep the stream straight up and down, start in the middle and work your way out to the edge moving the stream clockwise.  Try to not pour water on the edge of the coffee but keep a little space of coffee grounds between the pour and the filter all the way around.  These pours are usually 15-25 seconds apart.

8.  If using your scale, you will want to stop pouring at 800 grams.  This should give you a 24 ounces of coffee and the pourover should be complete as close to 4 minutes and 45 seconds as possible.   

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FRENCH PRESS

French Press was the brewing champion of the 90's and still draws attention today.  They are an easy to use manual brewing option and often come in large sizes so that you can make more at once.  We don't often use them at By the Bean but we do keep some available for retail and think they can be useful in many applications.  Often coffee that is made with a french press will be full bodies, less subtle complexity, but can really pull out some of the predominant flavors in the beans.  It's a full immersion method like the AeroPress, but much grittier as many of the grounds will make there way through the wire mesh filter.  

What you need:  French Press, Hot Water (195-205 degrees), scale, and your favorite whole bean coffee from By the Bean

1.  For a 5 cup french press you will be making 30 ounces of coffee.  So measure your beans to 60 grams and then grind them on as coarse as possible like pebbles.  

2.  Put the coffee in the french press and set a timer for 5 minutes

3.  Slowly pour hot water to the top of the french press leaving room for the lid.  

4. After 2 minutes has gone by on the time go ahead stir the french press at least 6 full turns, immersing the grounds completely.  We recommend a plastic or bamboo spoon to protect the glass.  

5.  Set the lid on top but do not plunge.

6.  When the timer is complete, slowly plunge the french press filter into the grounds.  When it is at the bottom, your coffee is complete.  We recommend 3-5 minutes to cool off which will also maximize flavor.